Tag: Jameson Hart

Canadians find final piece of puzzle in inaugural CPBL season

The last piece of the puzzle for the Great Lake Canadians program was to find a place to get some games in on home soil, and through the inaugural season of the Canadian Premier Baseball League, it did just that.

“It was huge for us,” Great Lake director of baseball operations Chris Robinson said. “Obviously we were on a little bit of an island there, and we were always really fortunate that the Fieldhouse Pirates were in the same boat…so we were always able to play them.

“But to have the competition week in, week out, against the five other programs [with the Pirates, as well as the Ontario Blue Jays, Ontario Nationals, Team Ontario and Toronto Mets], it separated quickly. That’s the one piece of the program that we felt we were missing, was the consistent high-level competition, and for us that was the excitement of last year.”

In their fourth year of the Canadians program, Great Lake has established a staff and routine that they’ve found comfort in, not making many changes throughout this off-season but continuing to build on the success they’ve found. The biggest difference between last season in the CPBL and the upcoming year will be the addition of a new squad at the youngest level of the circuit.

“We stick with what we’ve done in the past in terms of the off-season,” Robinson said. “Our guys start up now and we’ll run twice a week for most teams throughout the off-season. We’ll take our spring trip with the older groups to Florida. We did add a team this year, we added a 14U team, so we’re going to have two 14U teams this year and that will make six for us, so that’s exciting. We feel like we have a pretty solid group of guys and we can start to build from the bottom now and work up.”

To prepare for the upcoming season, Great Lake will take its top teams down south to St. Petersburg, Florida, on the same trip they’ve done in the past with an additional showcase opportunity for their players this spring.

“We’ll be back at St. Pete’s again, the same place we were the last two years,” the program’s director of baseball operations said. “We head down there March 11th to 17th and we’ll play six to seven games, and this year we’re going to do a scout day for the first time. So we’re going to have a showcase-type day, and play a game in the afternoon that day, on Tuesday, March 14th.

“It will be a mixture of our 16U, 17U and 18U teams. [Adam Hall, Canada’s top prospect heading into the draft] is going, so that’s obviously going to be a draw in terms of scouting and getting some exposure not only for him but for some of the other kids.”

Proud to be a part of the CPBL in the inaugural season, and contribute to the high calibre of play the loop provided on a consistent basis – also benefitting from the level of competition when they ventured out of the country and into a number of American tournaments throughout the summer – the Canadians are excited to find even more success both in and out of the league this year.

“That was the good part about last year, having an understanding that you’re playing programs now where some teams are going to have good years and some teams are going to have bad years,” Robinson said. “That’s just inevitable but if you don’t show up and play on a Saturday, you get beat. That teaches our guys, and speaking with the other programs and other coaches and guys who run programs within the league, we all had very successful tournament seasons last year.

“On our end, it was probably one of the most successful – from top to bottom – tournament seasons that we’ve ever had. It’s a direct correlation to being challenged for four games a weekend every weekend, and having to play at that level for four games rather than maybe showing up for a weekend against I-don’t-know-who and playing a good team, knowing you’ve got to gear up.”

In the busiest fall season the program has had in its four years, it felt to Robinson as though players were solidifying their commitments to college day after day, which provided enjoyment for all those involved.

“There are 10 guys for us who are ’17 commits, and there is one player who’s an ’18 commit,” he said. “We’ve had 11 guys, and it was in a span of about a month-and-a-half which is something we’ve never done. It’s been an exciting fall for us, no doubt…It was an exciting time for all our guys.”

From the start of the program to the success it has found over time, a lot has already happened and changed for Great Lake, and the Canadians look forward to what more may come as they continue their progression.

“This is year four,” Robinson said. “It’s neat. When we started, it was a lot about [the coaching staff]. It was about Adam Arnold, Adam Stern, Jamie Romak, and now it’s more about the kids. They’ve taken this program and it’s about [alum] Matt Warkentin [currently at Johnson County Community College in Kansas] and Michael Brettell [at Central Michigan] and these guys who are going off and continuing to build our brand by doing what they’re doing. It’s exciting. We’ve got a lot of guys going out this year, it’s a big class for us, so we hope it continues.”

Among the players who will see their CPBL tenures come to an end this summer, the Great Lake Canadians are sending Adam Hall to Texas A&M, Jordan Marks to the University of South Carolina Upstate in Spartanburg, Jameson Hart to Indian Hills Community College in Ottumwa, Iowa, Jonathan Burkhart to Heartland Community College in Normal, Illinois, Justin Snow to Southeastern Community College in West Burlington, Iowa, Noah Myers to Wabash Valley Community College in Mount Carmel, Illinois, Eric Lindsay and Jake English to Dodge City Community College in Kansas, Dallas Hunter to Parkland Community College in Champaign, Illinois, and Corben Peters to Cloud County Community College in Concordia, Kansas. Matt Jenkins is also committed to Santa Clara University for the 2018 season.

Great Lake Canadians and Ontario Blue Jays impress at T12

TORONTO – The fourth-annual Tournament 12 featured some impressive familiar faces, and three combined no-hitters on the second day of games on Saturday, two of them thrown by Ontario squads and using all Canadian Premier Baseball League hurlers.

In the second contest of the day, Ontario Green used three CPBL arms to no-hit Alberta Red, finishing the game in a scoreless tie. The first hit of the game was a two-out infield single in the bottom of the fourth, from Great Lake Canadians infielder Tye Imeson, who had two of the team’s three total hits.

“It was a combined no-no and the pitch counts were really low, so they did a great job,” said Mike Steed, a coach with both Green and the Ontario Blue Jays program. “In 1-1 counts, all you’ve got to do is throw that first-pitch strike and you’re in control. The other team absolutely pitched well, there wasn’t a whole lot of offence on both sides. They kept the hitters off balance and changed eye levels. Good pitching.”

OBJ southpaw Harley Gollert got the start and in three innings of work he walked one and struck out six. GLC right-hander Jake English followed out of the bullpen with two perfect frames and three strikeouts, before OBJ righty Nathan Holmes finished it off with two walks, fanning two in his two innings.

“They were excited in the dugout, the guys who threw,” Steed said. “Harley and then Jake, as soon as they got the last out in the top of the seventh, Harley looked at me and said, ‘Hey, combined no-no,’ so they know what’s going on and it’s exciting for them.”

Ontario Black followed suit in the final matchup of the day with a combined no-no of their own, using three more CPBL pitchers to get the job done and take down Alberta Red 4-0 to head into Sunday.

Griffin Hassall, a 16-year-old right-hander from the GLC program, took the mound to start the game and battled through an early blister for three innings, walking two and fanning five. Fellow Great Lake hurler Mitchell Stemerdink walked three and added two strikeouts in two frames. OBJ southpaw Alex Jones completed the no-hitter, striking out six in his two innings.

“It’s pretty great for the kids,” said Chris Robinson, a coach for both Black and the GLC program. “That was an impressive, well-pitched game. All those guys threw really well. I know Hassel was battling over a little blister there, and he went out for the second inning and he didn’t care, he pitched right through it. It was good.”

The hurlers got some help from 16-year-old Blue Jays catcher Noah Naylor, who threw out three attempted base stealers, set the tone behind the plate, and helped his squad to face just three batters over the minimum in the matchup.

“I told them to trust their stuff,” Naylor said of the pitchers. “The fastball was live today, and I just told them to be confident in it, and obviously that’s going to help them have a good game…I just try to be my best behind the plate, give them that insurance that they can trust me back there. I know when they’re throwing, they’re comfortable throwing to me, they can trust me with runners on the basepaths, and also with just doing my job.”

Added Robinson, a former big-league catcher: “He’s separated himself. It’s pretty exciting to watch. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a transfer that quick at this level, he gets rid of the ball so quickly. He’s got a great arm too but that was impressive.”

The Canadian Junior National Team catcher continues to improve with time, and has been nothing short of electric behind the plate at his second Tournament 12.

“He just keeps getting better every time I see him, especially behind the plate,” Robinson said. “It’s impressive. In my mind, there’s no doubt that he can catch at the next level, even now, and he’s still got a couple years to go. He’s a really exciting player.

“I know he’s going to draw comparisons to his brother [Josh, last year’s 12th-overall pick in the draft] forever, but that’s not fair because they’re two different players. But he’s got to be one of the more exciting catching prospects we’ve ever had in this country.”

Between the two CPBL-dominant no-hitters, Black lost an early contest against BC Orange 4-3, walked off on a wild pitch after battling through the fourth affair on Saturday.

Great Lake shortstop Adam Hall notched three of his team’s five total hits – one to keep the squad alive in the top of the seventh – and drove in two of Black’s three runs, adding two stolen bases and stellar defence. In three days of Tourament 12, the 17-year-old has made it clear why he is at the top of next year’s draft class.

“He brings a level of intensity every day to the field,” said Adam Stern, his coach with both Ontario Green and the GLC program. “He hates to lose, that’s the biggest thing you have to understand about Adam…That was a good game right there because you get to see when the game’s on the line what happens, who rises to the occasion, and he’s come up with big hits for us, he came up with big hits out here, and when the game’s on the line, you want him up there.”

Futures Navy ran short on pitching in the fifth game of the day, matching up against a tough Ontario Green squad and leaving the field after six innings because of the tournament’s mercy rule, taking the 12-1 loss in a game prominently featuring players from the GLC program.

Green used three Canadians arms to get through the game, with right-hander Corben Peters taking the hill to start and allowing one run on three hits with two walks and two strikeouts. Fellow righty Garner Spoljaric followed with two perfect frames, and Dallas Hunter retired the side in order to secure the win for Ontario.

“It was a well-pitched game,” said Ontario Green coach Rick Johnston. “We swung the bats, the kids played really well. It was nice for them to go out and do what they did. Obviously there were some walks in there, but that’s going to happen, and we put the ball in play.”

Ontario first baseman Jameson Hart, an outfielder in the Great Lake program, paced the offence, going 2-for-2 with two walks and driving in three runs. 16-year-old GLC catcher Ian Jordan drove in the only run for the Navy squad, singling and walking in the game.